I am a huge fan of home workouts. Don’t get me wrong, I have spent some time in gyms as well. I love group workout sessions. But somewhere between hopping in the car and actually getting into the equipment or group class, I lose my excitement. There is only so much time available to me, on any given day, to get my workout done. If I want to attend an hour-long Zumba class, I have to add an extra hour to that time when you calculate the time to drive there, park, wait in line to check in, find a locker, and make my way up to the studio, and then repeat on the way out. Plus, I am kinda creeped out by the germs on the equipment. But I digress!!!  I love my gym-rat fans and wish you all the best!

But for those like me, who would rather do your workout in your own home, when you want, where you want, wearing whatever you want, I have some tips for you to stay committed. Because, let’s face it, it’s hard to stay motivated when you have a million excuses around the house, to keep you from pressing play.

Here are seven tips to help you stay committed to your home workouts:

1. Find a workout you love

What kind of exercise you like to do? Are you starting as a fresh beginner, or just starting over?  Do you like high impact cardio, or strength training? Your fitness goals will also play into this. Are you looking to lose significant weight or just tighten and tone. Consider your goals as you contemplate what type of exercise you would enjoy. Also consider, how long you are willing to commit to exercise. There are a variety of programs available on DVD or streaming, each of varying lengths. What is your commitment level? Finding a workout you love should be exciting!!! Exercise is a lifestyle, not a chore.

2. Ask yourself, “How will I stay motivated?”

We all know, there will be days when you are just not feeling it. You hit the snooze and roll over or open your laptop and get sucked in to social media or work, when you should be getting your behind out of bed and getting your sweat on! Everyone has days like this. Honestly, there will be some days when you do need the extra sleep or the additional rest day. But this cannot be a set back to your goals!  Know WHY you are making exercise part of your lifestyle. Be vividly clear on the reason behind being healthy. Write it down, tape it to your mirror, refrigerator or home screen on your phone.  Your WHY is what is going to snap you back to the deep-rooted meaning of your journey.

3. Track your activity

It’s so easy to go easy on ourselves, when it comes to monitoring our food and activity. In our mind, it seems like we only missed one day of working out this week. We find ways to justify our slacking ways. Wen you write down, journal, or update your fitness tracker app, the reality is right there for you. There is no mistaking your activity level and you are provided with immediate feedback on how you’re doing. You can also benefit from tracking other healthy habits such as water intake and sticking to your eating plan. Rather than thinking of all things you are being “denied” in this healthy lifestyle, focus on what you get to add!  Yummmm! Fresh fruit and vegetables, deliciously balanced meals that don’t make me feel bloated. Your skin feeling great and inflammation lowered because you have added more water. Focus on those amazing new habits you get to add! Write it down every day.

4. Focus on activity goals

Get rid of the scale! The scale is just one small indicator of your health. Really, all it’s telling you is the force of gravity on your body. It doesn’t tell you that you’ve built up your muscle mass, are hydrated, and your digestive system is working much better. The scale is a ball and chain. Instead, focus on the activity goals you set for yourself at the beginning of the week. Such as: Sticking to the meal plan, doing 5 push ups, doing your workout the number of days you committed to and so forth. Make your goals realistic and attainable-even if small

5. Find an accountability partner.

Find an accountability partner to keep you honest, and connect with them every day. Ideally, this person should be one who truly cares about your success and will call you out on your junk (lovingly, of course). Daily accountability is a sure-fire way to engrave those new habits and keep you right in the groove. In addition, you can join accountability and support groups. Having a larger group of like-minded friends, can really make the journey so much more fun! Positive peer pressure is a game-changer.

6. Be patient and positive.

Change takes TIME. There is just no way around it.  Lasting change is for the long-term and so we cannot expect a quick fix. It has likely taken you a long time to get to this point, so allow yourself the time to redirect old habits.  Staying focused on your lifestyle goals, rather than the scale, will help you stay positive. Tracking your activity will provide real-time feedback, allowing you to reflect and see first-hand how far you’ve come. You can also listen to informative and inspirational podcasts. Some of favorites are Chalene Johnson, Shaun T, and Shawn Stevenson.

7. Celebrate!

Last, but not least, you MUST celebrate the small and the big wins!! This is so critical to keep your eyes focused on the positive. Every Friday or Saturday, look back at your goals, compared to activity and give yourself a high-five!!!

All of the tips listed above, work together. You must first assess your goals and commitment level to find a program that you love to do. You want to look forward to your workout. Have a plan for staying motivated. Write it down and put it where you will easily see it every day. Track your activity for yourself and find an accountability partner to hold you to it. No matter whether you had a bad week or a rock star week, all lasting change takes patience. A positive attitude makes it enjoyable. And finally, celebrate your victories!!!  It’s the juice that keeps your fire burning.

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